What is the word for when players give all high level advantages to lvl 1 players?

Say that you start a new character in a online game which has ways to progress (such as leveling up / improving your character) and you’re playing it with a friend that knows 100% about the game, but also starts to point directions (skipping tutorials), giving you all high level stuff (say, the best items you’d find in a high level dungeon, or unique ones), and if possible, to make you level up asap.

I’m really sure that there’s a name for such typical acts.

Answer

There are several terms to cover the behaviors you are asking about.

Giving Powerful Items = Twinking

Some of the behavior you are describing is called twinking.

In role-playing video games, particularly MMORPGs, twinking refers to outfitting a new character or player with items or other resources that are not normally available to new or low-level characters.

The Wikipedia page goes further to include some types of hacking as part of twinking, but I’ve always heard it used as giving really good gear to a low level character. In my experience with MMORPGs, a small amount of twinking always happens (like a higher level character finds some loot that is great for a lower level character) but it becomes frowned upon when the lower level character is twinked so much that it has the absolute best gear for each slot and the character absolutely dominates an untwinked character of the same level.

Note that most games restrict more powerful items to more powerful characters. Sometimes these items will have level or stat requirements, preventing a level 1 character from using them. Other times the items will be untradeable so that the lower level character must actually complete the content themselves to get the item.

Helping Gain XP Quickly = Powerleveling / Boosting

Power leveling describes a higher level character doing all the work to take a lower level character through more powerful content than they could normally handle. This was more prevalent in earlier games, as newer games have anti-powerlevelling mechanics that make it less efficient for the lower level character. These games don’t award XP/loot if the character doesn’t do a good portion of the work or if they are too low a level for the area.

Skipping Content To Get To High Level Areas = Rushing / Running

The skipping tutorials portion of the behavior you describe is closer to rushing or running, such as the higher level character “running” the lower level character through dungeons or areas so that the lower level character can pick up warp locations and such. Again, this is not as prevalent in newer games as older ones. In earlier games, unlocking a new area was sometimes as easy as walking into the area and talking to someone. Newer games will lock content behind mandatory quests, gear checks (meaning that the character must earn particular types of gear elsewhere order to enter the area), or level requirements. These mechanisms make it take longer to unlock the area, so a rush or run through is more difficult (but still possible) for someone very dedicated to helping a lower level character.

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Source : Link , Question Author : Fabián , Answer Author : Community

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